Students star in acclaimed London theatre production - Westminster Kingsway College

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Students star in acclaimed London theatre production

Wednesday 13 December 2017

 

It’s 2040 and London streets are consumed with an impenetrable fog. Unable to see. Unable to breath. Londoners are forced to wear masks in order to survive.

That was the premise of Fog Everywhere, a new play that ran in November at the Camden People’s Theatre and featured Westminster Kingsway students in the lead roles.

Whether the depiction of London in Fog Everywhere represents an accurate vision of the future or a hyperbolic dystopian fantasy remains to be seen, but how do two of the play’s leads, Emily and Aleksandra, feel about London’s carbon footprint, having been immersed in its effects for the last month? Emily has certainly been made more aware:

“I was definitely shocked to learn about London air pollution, because before Fog Everywhere it was a subject matter at the back of my mind, but it wasn’t something important to me. But from this show I have taken a lot of information that has really changed my views on things, like transport.”

The same goes for Aleksandra, who highlights the need for the arts to be more responsive to environmental issues:

“The play had an important message and it was portrayed in an interesting and abstract way that will appeal to different people. I do personally think it’s an important subject and more needs to be done on it.”

Fog Everywhere was directed by Camden People’s Theatre’s artistic director, Brian Logan in partnership with Westminster Kingsway and KCL’s Lung Biology Group. The play was part of Shoot The Breeze, a two-week festival that aims to shine a light on environmental issues. For many of the actors, it was their first time working in such a big theatre production.

Emily: “It was a really great experience, I loved being part of a theatre company and being able to perform the show more than once was great. I’ve learnt a lot more about doing theatre work and it has given me an insight to how it will be when I’m out of college and performing full time.

“I’ve done a variety of stage performances but this performance was different because it wasn’t a one-time show, we had long full days of rehearsals and ten shows across two weeks, giving me the experience as a full time performer and the hard work that it requires. I loved it though, you’re working hard to create this show, then performing it to ten different audiences.”

Aleksandra: “It was a great opportunity and I made new connections and gained new skills. Although it wasn’t my first stage performance but it was the first time I experienced what a two-week run would be like. It gave me an insight into what it feels like and the work, I, as an actress am expected to put in.”

It’s also the first time our students have been exposed to the dread or elation of reading reviews. But surprisingly there’s no such trepidation for Emily, who deals with positive and negative opinions with a maturity beyond her years.

“It was fantastic, I loved reading all the negative ones as much as the positive. The positive makes me carry on performing and shows me that I’m doing well at what I love, and keeps me pushing on. The negative is just as good because it shows me what I can improve on, and keeps me going and developing as an actress.”

Keep an eye out for more plays involving our students in the new year!

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